Molly Stevens’ Braised Monkfish with Cherry Tomatoes & Basil

Molly Stevens’ Braised Monkfish with Cherry Tomatoes & Basil might be just the main course you are searching for. For $17.88 per serving, this recipe covers 44% of your daily requirements of vitamins and minerals. One serving contains 874 calories, 76g of protein, and 36g of fat. This recipe serves 3. If you have basil, tomato & basil sauce, fennel, and a few other ingredients on hand, you can make it. 13 people have made this recipe and would make it again. It is brought to you by The Amateur Gourmet. From preparation to the plate, this recipe takes about 45 minutes. All things considered, we decided this recipe deserves a spoonacular score of 86%. This score is tremendous. Similar recipes are Braised Monkfish With Bacon And Tomatoes, Zucchini Noodles with Cherry Tomatoes and Basil, and Chicken En Papillote With Basil and Cherry Tomatoes.

Servings: 3

 

Ingredients:

2 Tbs shredded fresh basil

Freshly ground black pepper

Add another tablespoon of oil to the pan, along with the tomatoes and garlic.

Coarse salt

1 cup finely chopped fennel (about 1/2 bulb)

2 garlic cloves, minced

1 pint cherry or grape tomatoes

Molly Stevens' Braised Monkfish with Cherry Tomatoes & Basil

Cut the monkfish fillet into 4 equal servings.

1 1/2 pounds monkfish fillets

3 Tbs extra-virgin olive oil

2 thick slices pancetta (2 ounces), cut into 1-inch pieces

Serve and enjoy!

Pinch of crushed red pepper flakes

6. Transfer the monkfish to warm plates. Stir the basil into the sauce, taste for salt and pepper and spoon it around the fish on each plate.

1/4 cup water, plus more as needed

April 8, 2008 |

By Adam Roberts |

Categories: Recipes, Seafood

COMMENTS

Let Molly work her magic in your kitchen after a hard day's work. Here's how you make it…

Next » April in Paris

Tags: braising, fish, Molly Stevens

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Equipment:

slotted spoon

paper towels

tongs

wooden spoon

frying pan

fillet knife

knife

spatula

Cooking instruction summary:

With tongs or a slotted spoon, transfer to paper towels to drain.2. Return the skillet to medium heat, add the fennel and season with salt and the red pepper flakes. Stir with a wooden spoon to coat the fennel with the oil and pancetta drippings and saute for just a minute or two, until the fennel begins to sizzle.Add 1/4 cup water and stir and scrape the bottom to dislodge and dissolve any tasty cooked-on pancetta bits. Cover, reduce the heat to medium-low, and braise, stirring a few times, until the fennel is tender with just a little resistance, about 7 minutes.Add another tablespoon of oil to the pan, along with the tomatoes and garlic.Increase the heat to medium and saute, uncovered, shaking and stirring frequently, until the tomatoes begin to burst, about 10 minutes. Stir often and scrape up the lovely caramelized crust that will develop on the bottom of the skillet. When about half the tomatoes have burst, about 12 minutes, add another 2 to 3 tablespoons of water and the pancetta, cover, reduce the heat to medium-low and let simmer, stirring occassionally, while you prepare the fish.3. Inspect the monkfish. Most monkfish comes from the market with a thin grayish, rather slimy membrane covering the fish. This is a natural layer that exists between the skin and the pure white fillet and it should be removed for aesthetic and textural reasons. Some markets trim this for you, but most do not. using a sharp paring knife or fillet knife, trim away the membrane without cutting into the fish. Trim off any dark patches on the monkfish as well.[I actually found it quite difficult to cut away all the dark bits. I did the best I could but, retrospectively, I shouldn't have stressed so much; the dark bits that remained were fine and mostly obscured by the sauce.]Cut the monkfish fillet into 4 equal portions.4. Pat the monkfish fillets dry with paper towels and season all over with salt and pepper. Heat the remaining tablespoon of oil in a medium nonstick skillet (9 to 10-inch) over medium high heat. When the oil shimmers, add the fish and saute until it has lost its raw appearance and the outside is pale golden, 4 minutes per side.5. Transfer the fillets to the simmering tomato-fennel sauce. With a rubber spatula, scrape any oil or juices from the nonstick skillet onto the fillets. Cover and simmer gently over low heat, turning the fillets after 4 minutes, until the fish is just cooked through, about 8 minutes total.6. Transfer the monkfish to warm plates. Stir the basil into the sauce, taste for salt and pepper and spoon it around the fish on each plate.Serve and enjoy!Tags: braising, fish, Molly StevensCategories: Recipes, Seafood

 

Step by step:


1. With tongs or a slotted spoon, transfer to paper towels to drain.

2. Return the skillet to medium heat, add the fennel and season with salt and the red pepper flakes. Stir with a wooden spoon to coat the fennel with the oil and pancetta drippings and saute for just a minute or two, until the fennel begins to sizzle.

3. Add 1/4 cup water and stir and scrape the bottom to dislodge and dissolve any tasty cooked-on pancetta bits. Cover, reduce the heat to medium-low, and braise, stirring a few times, until the fennel is tender with just a little resistance, about 7 minutes.

4. Add another tablespoon of oil to the pan, along with the tomatoes and garlic.Increase the heat to medium and saute, uncovered, shaking and stirring frequently, until the tomatoes begin to burst, about 10 minutes. Stir often and scrape up the lovely caramelized crust that will develop on the bottom of the skillet. When about half the tomatoes have burst, about 12 minutes, add another 2 to 3 tablespoons of water and the pancetta, cover, reduce the heat to medium-low and let simmer, stirring occassionally, while you prepare the fish.

5. Inspect the monkfish. Most monkfish comes from the market with a thin grayish, rather slimy membrane covering the fish. This is a natural layer that exists between the skin and the pure white fillet and it should be removed for aesthetic and textural reasons. Some markets trim this for you, but most do not. using a sharp paring knife or fillet knife, trim away the membrane without cutting into the fish. Trim off any dark patches on the monkfish as well.[I actually found it quite difficult to cut away all the dark bits. I did the best I could but, retrospectively, I shouldn't have stressed so much; the dark bits that remained were fine and mostly obscured by the sauce.]

6. Cut the monkfish fillet into 4 equal portions.

7. Pat the monkfish fillets dry with paper towels and season all over with salt and pepper.

8. Heat the remaining tablespoon of oil in a medium nonstick skillet (9 to 10-inch) over medium high heat. When the oil shimmers, add the fish and saute until it has lost its raw appearance and the outside is pale golden, 4 minutes per side.

9. Transfer the fillets to the simmering tomato-fennel sauce. With a rubber spatula, scrape any oil or juices from the nonstick skillet onto the fillets. Cover and simmer gently over low heat, turning the fillets after 4 minutes, until the fish is just cooked through, about 8 minutes total.

10. Transfer the monkfish to warm plates. Stir the basil into the sauce, taste for salt and pepper and spoon it around the fish on each plate.

11. Serve and enjoy!Tags: braising, fish, Molly Stevens

12. Categories: Recipes, Seafood


Nutrition Information:

Quickview
873k Calories
75g Protein
35g Total Fat
58g Carbs
59% Health Score
Limit These
Calories
873k
44%

Fat
35g
55%

  Saturated Fat
6g
43%

Carbohydrates
58g
20%

  Sugar
9g
11%

Cholesterol
125mg
42%

Sodium
1016mg
44%

Get Enough Of These
Protein
75g
152%

Selenium
169µg
243%

Vitamin C
127mg
154%

Vitamin A
5488IU
110%

Phosphorus
1010mg
101%

Vitamin B6
1mg
76%

Potassium
2662mg
76%

Vitamin B12
4µg
70%

Vitamin B3
13mg
69%

Vitamin K
35µg
34%

Vitamin E
4mg
33%

Magnesium
130mg
33%

Vitamin B2
0.46mg
27%

Folate
106µg
27%

Fiber
6g
26%

Manganese
0.48mg
24%

Vitamin B1
0.36mg
24%

Zinc
2mg
18%

Iron
3mg
17%

Copper
0.28mg
14%

Vitamin B5
1mg
12%

Calcium
100mg
10%

covered percent of daily need
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